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Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
, to be having the kind of conversations we are having now that you would have before the civil rights act of 1964 was passed and before the voting rights act. . tavis: is this a short-term strategy or long term? is this a strategy to get rid of barack obama, the first african american president? or is this a strategy they think it can win long-term for them, the strategy of voter suppression? >> i think they are playing a short-term game. it is not just about president obama but holding power every level of the electoral process. but i think what they are betting now is that some of these demographic changes are still in their infancy and we do not know yet what kind of turn out there will be among younger and hispanic voters and african americans, not only in 2012 and the gop is betting they can manipulate the electoral process in such a way that they could reduce turn out on the margins. if you look of the voter i.d. laws, the literature shows that the laws can depress voter turnout by three percentage points. that is enough to swing a close election. and they are betting that at least
. when the civil rights movement happened, they shifted. i remember discussions in the 1980's and 1990's. the latino community, to be appealed to on issues like small government and family values, and they wrote off that possibility, quite frankly, with racism, seeing every brown person, every latino, as an illegal. they have done the same thing with the asian community. they used to be very republican. coming from hostile countries -- they have been driven into the democratic party with subtle and not so subtle racial appeals. i think they believe if they can do what they did in 2010, they can turn out their older white bass, and they can hold onto power, and they can -- they can turn out their older what it -- white base -- it is not a permanent strategy, but it can keep them in power for a while. and it is ugly. tavis: the new book from joan walsh is "what's the matter with white people?: why we long for a golden age that never was." she tells a wonderful story about her family and their presence. i have only scratched the surface, so you may want to pick it up. joan, thank you. >> th
in this country. the book is called "the price of civilization". a conversation with professor jeffrey sachs coming up right now. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome jeffrey sachs back to this program. he is one of the most important voices in our time. the director of the earth institute at columbia. his latest book is called "the price of civilization." he joins us tonight from new york. jeffrey sachs, good to have you back on this program. >> good to be back on. tavis: what has happened in this country since you wrote this book that made to put some new stuff in it for the paperback version? >> this book was about things really going wrong in america. the lack of civic virtue
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)